Fossil of an unknown dinosaur found in Brazil

Fossil of an unknown dinosaur found in Brazil



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A fossil about 115 million years old was found in northeast Brazil. It belongs to a hitherto unknown species of dinosaur.

Its about "Aratasaurus museunacionali", A new species of medium-sized theropod, which reached 3.12 meters in height and could weigh up to 34.25 kilograms.

The fossil was found in 2008 in a geological region in the state of Ceará and the results of research carried out by scientists from the Federal University of Pernambuco, the National Museum of Rio and the Regional University of Cariri.

This finding will help to understand the evolutionary history of theropods, which make up the group of carnivorous dinosaurs whose current representatives are birds. In addition, it is a sign that other types of carnivorous dinosaurs inhabited that region of the country millions of years ago.

As the fossil is unique it contains all the information about that species. After being discovered in a gypsum mine in 2008, the Aratasaurus fossil was transferred to the Placido Cidade Nuvens Museum of Paleontology, in Ceará, and then sent to the Academic Center of Vitória, of the Federal University of Pernambuco, to be prepared and studied.

This process was delayed and slow because the preparation involved removing the rock that surrounded the fossil, which was in fragile conditions that made the work complex.

Between 2008 and 2016, microscopic analyzes of their tissues were carried out using small samples of the bones, as well as a scanning electron microscopy with which a greater amount of information was obtained with which it has been possible to make a reconstruction of what this animal would be like in lifetime.

Via Federal University of Pernambuco.


Video: Dinosaur Foot is Best-Preserved Theropod Fossil in Brazil. National Geographic